A Light Dusting

We had a light dusting of sleet and snow a few days ago. Certainly travel was dangerous the morning after, but we were spared the problems they had in Atlanta. You wouldn’t know it by the school closings and general disruption of official activities here in the Charlotte area.

The wind blew over an ice-laden arbor…the one covered with the beautiful evergreen Confederate Jasmine (Trachelospermum jasminoides) that greets visitors along the side of our home. It bashed into a favorite Berckman’s arborvitae (Thuja orientalis ‘Berckmanii’). The arborvitae will recover with spring growth, but I had to cut the jasmine to the ground to untangle the arbor. Based on the vigor of its past growth, I expect to witness its resurgence come spring. Now I have to devise a better method of securing my arbor.

I’ve learned to appreciate color in my light dusted garden. The pots…particularly the blue ones placed throughout my beds…certainly caught my attention. Even more so have been the cardinals and bluebirds, devouring my offerings in the feeders and suet cages.

About johnvic8

John Viccellio retired after 24 years in the U. S. Navy and began to dig into gardening when he could finally land in one place. He completed the Master Gardener course in 1992 and has since designed and constructed two of his own gardens. He wrote a monthly garden column for ten years and was a regular contributor to Carolina Gardener magazine. John published his first book, Guess What's in My Garden!, in 2014. He lives in Stallings, NC with his wife, in close proximity to six of his eight grandchildren.
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2 Responses to A Light Dusting

  1. The nice thing about snow in NC is that we know it won’t last, Reminded how effective color is in the garden this time of year, I went and looked at by blue containers and agree, blue works!

    Like

  2. johnvic8 says:

    Thanks, Stepheny. I’m becoming more aware of the importance of colored “stuff” in the garden. It can be a nice counterpoint to plants.

    Like

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