Pass the Mustard

Popular winter annuals in our area over recent years include leafy veggies, especially colorful ornamental cabbages and kales. Last fall I “discovered” a new winter veggie that caught my eye for its fabulous deep purple foliage. I had to try it.

Let me introduce you to “Miz America” mustard.

Two of these have been in pots on my porch the entire winter. They have lived through freezing temperatures, ice storms, and heavy winds and continue to thrive, showing little damage.

I don’t know if they will continue to look so well when summer comes, but I will keep them on the porch long enough to see if heat causes them to fade.

I will certainly look for them next fall.

“Miz America” mustard is a winner.

 

 

About johnvic8

John Viccellio retired after 24 years in the U. S. Navy and began to dig into gardening when he could finally land in one place. He completed the Master Gardener course in 1992 and has since designed and constructed two of his own gardens. He wrote a monthly garden column for ten years and was a regular contributor to Carolina Gardener magazine. John published his first book, Guess What's in My Garden!, in 2014. He lives in Stallings, NC with his wife, in close proximity to six of his eight grandchildren.
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14 Responses to Pass the Mustard

  1. Looks lush and healthy, John. What does it taste like?

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  2. Cathy says:

    I am also wondering if you have tried nibbling a leaf. 😉

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  3. Christina says:

    I have a very similar mustard plant in the vegetable garden but under a different name.

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  4. Lindy Le Coq says:

    Hardy winter color and texture is always welcome! Thanks for the tip, John.

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  5. I have one as well and am also enjoying it with Dianthus, Marigolds and Dusty Miller.

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  6. Lisa says:

    I’d try it. All the seed company catalogs I’ve seen sell it as an edible from baby leaf to mature. It’s supposed to be slightly peppery.
    It does make a beautiful potted plant though!

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